Visiting Scholars

Writer-in-Residence

Maya Arad

Maya Arad is an acclaimed author of Hebrew narrative prose and verse. Her debut novel in verse, "Another Place, a Foreign City" (Tel Aviv 2003) became a best-seller, was on the final shortlist for the Sapir prize (the Israeli “Booker”) and was adapted as a musical by the Kameri Theater. She has since published a play in verse, "The Righteous Forsaken", a Hebrew adaptation of Griboedov’s Woe from Wit (Tel Aviv 2005). These two books made her a leading figure of the revival of form in contemporary Hebrew verse. Her more recent books include "Seven Moral Failings", a novel (Tel Aviv 2006), "Family Pictures", a collection of three novellas (Tel Aviv 2008), "Positions of Stress: Essays on Israeli Literature between Sound and History" (Tel Aviv 2008), "Short Story Master" (Tel Aviv 2009) and "Suspected Dementia" (Tel Aviv 2011).

"Another Place, a Foreign City" was chosen by Yedioth Achronot (one of Israel’s leading newspapers) to be included in its list of Ten Books of the Decade 2000-2010, while Ma’ariv (another leading newspapers) chose "Seven Moral Failings" for its own list of Twenty Books of the Decade 2000-2010.

Maya Arad has obtained her BA in Classics from Tel Aviv University and a PhD in Linguistics from University College, London. She is the author of "Roots and Patterns: Hebrew Morpo-Syntax" (Dordrecht 2005). She has taught at the universities of Harvard, Geneva and Stanford. She is currently a Writer in Residence at the Taube Center for Jewish Studies, Stanford since 2009.

2013-2014

Tobin Belzer

(Spring 2014-Fall 2014)

Tobin Belzer, PhD is a sociologist of contemporary American Jewry.  Her research and program evaluations have focused on Jewish identity, gender, Jewish organizational culture, Jewish teens and emerging adults, Jews with special needs, Jewish/Muslim relations, Jewish education, and congregational studies.  Belzer has been Research Associate at the Center for Religion and Civic Culture at the University of Southern California since 2004.  She has worked with and for numerous organizations and foundations including: the Foundation for Jewish Culture, the Yiddish Book Center, the Institute for Jewish Spirituality, the Cohen Center for Modern Jewish Studies, The Koret Foundation, the Lilly Endowment, the Jim Joseph Foundation, the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation, The John Templeton Foundation and the Covenant Foundation.  From 2010-2012, Belzer served as the Senior Project Director at Rosov Consulting, LLC, a strategic consultancy that helps foundations, philanthropists and Jewish communal organizations meet their goals, assess progress, and enhance impact.  She earned her doctorate in Sociology and Master’s Degree in Women’s Studies from Brandeis University. As a doctoral candidate, she was awarded the Joshua Venture Fellowship for Young Jewish Social Entrepreneurs.  This grant funded her research on the intersection of young adult Jewish identity and Jewish organizational culture.  Belzer was a 2007-08 Fellow of the Congregational Studies Team's Engaged Scholars Program, funded by the Lilly Endowment. With Rabbi Julie Pelc Adler, she is the co-editor of Joining the Sisterhood: Young Jewish Women Write Their Lives (SUNY Press, 2003).

Svetlana Natkovichphoto of Svetlana

Svetlana Natkovich is a Rothschild Post-Doctoral Fellow. She is a graduate of the Department of Hebrew literature at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev in Israel. Her book, Amongst Radiant Clouds: Literature of Vladimir (Zeev) Jabotinsky in a Social Context, is forthcoming from the Magnes Press. Her current research delves into the questions of Russian-Jewish self-fashioning in the second half of the 19th century and analyzes the dynamic of differentiation of the Jewish literatures into Hebrew, Yiddish and Russian-Jewish literary corpora. Her research interests include questions of the relations between literature and ideology, the formation of Jewish nationalisms, the dynamics of Jewish modernization and secularization. After her stay at Stanford she will continue on to Simon-Dubnow-Institute in Leipzig, Germany.

Anat Weisman

Anat Weisman is an Associate Professor at the Department of Hebrew Literature in Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel. She completed her undergraduate studies in Philosophy and Literature at Tel Aviv University and her Ph.D. at The Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Her research focuses on Modern Hebrew Literature and Hermeneutics. Her most recent publications include annotated anthology of Hebrew writings by Mendele Mokher Sfarim with postface (Mendele Ha'ivri, Tel-Aviv, 2013) and two articles on Leah Goldberg‘s work: "After all of this, I will have to muster all of my 'courage for the mundane': On Leah Goldberg's Paradigmatic Temperament" (Prooftexts, 32.3, 2013) and  "Hommage mit doppeltem Boden Die Gestalt Lea Goldbergs in 'Begegnung mit einem Dichter' " (Naharaim, Vol. 7, Issue 1-2, Dec 2013).

Arie Dubnov2012-2013

Arie Dubnov

Arie Dubnov was a lecturer in the History Department at Stanford. He came to us from The Hebrew University as a lecturer in History there. His interests are in modern intellectual history, with emphasis on history of British political thought and modern Jewish history.

Amos Bitzan

While historians have largely neglected studying representations of violence as artifacts of inherent interest separate from the events they describe, Amos Bitzan's dissertation in History addresses the discursive mediation of violence itself. Titled Jewish Representations of Violence in the First World War and its Aftermath, Mr. Bitzan's work focuses on the years between 1914 and 1920, a period when hundreds of thousands of eastern European Jews were expelled from their homes, robbed, attacked and killed by soldiers, irregular fighters, and even fellow civilians. Drawing upon letters, newspaper articles, rabbinic decisions on Jewish law, poems, administrative reports by military authorities, photographs, and pamphlets, Mr. Bitzan asserts that how we write about and publicize acts of violence not only shapes our short- and long-term responses to them; it also informs our identities as individuals, members of particular communities, and human beings coexisting with others. By studying what eastern European Jews wrote, fantasized, read, and did as they faced the chaos of early-twentieth-century warfare, Mr. Bitzan contextualizes figurations of violence generated in a particular historical moment, and uses them to interrogate the cultural practice of representing violent acts.

Eve Levavi Feinstein

Visiting Scholar, Taube Center for Jewish Studies

Elana Gomel

Visiting Scholar, Taube Center for Jewish Studies

Yael Goldstein Love

Yael Goldstein Love was born and raised in Highland Park, NJ, and attended the Rabbi Pesach Raymon Yeshiva. The final tweaks to her education came at Harvard, where she ignored her grandmother's many warnings and studied philosophy. After graduating college, Yael began work on Overture and supported herself with jobs including but not limited to: bartender, waitress, secretary, event planner, writer for Sparknotes Study Guides, admissions consultant, and publishing assistant for The Paris Review.  After graduating college, Yael began work on Overture and supported herself with jobs including but not limited to: bartender, waitress, secretary, event planner, writer for Sparknotes Study Guides, admissions consultant, and publishing assistant for The Paris Review.  In 2004 she published the short story When Skeptics Die in Commentary Magazine. In 2005 her essay When God is Your Favorite Writer appeared in the anthology Who We Are: On Being (and Not Being) A Jewish American Writer, which won the National Jewish Book Award. She sold Overture to Doubleday in 2005, and it was published in 2007. The paperback version of the novel will be published by Broadway Books in August 2008 under the title The Passion of Tasha Darsky. Yael currently lives in Cambridge, MA, where she teaches at Grub Street, Inc. and is at work on her second novel. Her hobbies include eating, worrying, and interstate moves. She also enjoys meeting with book clubs, in person or by phone. 

Hagit Halperin

HAGIT HALPERIN grew up on a kibbutz in Israel, where she studied at the Midrashah Le’Amanut, a college for art education. In New York, Hagit completed a master’s degree in Jewish Art and Visual Culture at The Jewish Theological Seminary, after receiving a bachelor’s degree in Restoration at the Fashion Institute of Technology. Hagit taught art and Hebrew for many years in schools in Israel and New York. More recently, Hagit was the education director at East End Temple, and she currently teaches Hebrew at the Rodeph Sholom School in Manhattan.

2011-2012

Arie Dubnov

Arie Dubnov is currently a lecturer in the History Department at Stanford. He comes to us from The Hebrew University as a lecturer in History there. His interests are in modern intellectual history, with emphasis on history of British political thought and modern Jewish history.

Amos Bitzan

While historians have largely neglected studying representations of violence as artifacts of inherent interest separate from the events they describe, Amos Bitzan's dissertation in History addresses the discursive mediation of violence itself. Titled Jewish Representations of Violence in the First World War and its Aftermath, Mr. Bitzan's work focuses on the years between 1914 and 1920, a period when hundreds of thousands of eastern European Jews were expelled from their homes, robbed, attacked and killed by soldiers, irregular fighters, and even fellow civilians. Drawing upon letters, newspaper articles, rabbinic decisions on Jewish law, poems, administrative reports by military authorities, photographs, and pamphlets, Mr. Bitzan asserts that how we write about and publicize acts of violence not only shapes our short- and long-term responses to them; it also informs our identities as individuals, members of particular communities, and human beings coexisting with others. By studying what eastern European Jews wrote, fantasized, read, and did as they faced the chaos of early-twentieth-century warfare, Mr. Bitzan contextualizes figurations of violence generated in a particular historical moment, and uses them to interrogate the cultural practice of representing violent acts.

Claude Lanzmann

Claude Lanzmann, born in Bois-Colombes, France on November 27, 1925, is a Paris-based filmmaker, writer and journalist, renowned for his unprecedented 'cinematic history of the Holocaust', the 9 ½ hour documentary film SHOAH (1985). In his work, Claude Lanzmann addresses questions of Jewish identity by turning to topics such as the Holocaust, openly opposing its prevailing commodification by the film industry. Instead, he presents the past and its contradictions as fractured and unresolved, refusing to create works that are easy to digest. During the Second World War, at age eighteen, Claude Lanzmann joined the French communist party and fought against the Nazis. As a preparation for the École Normale Supérieure, he completed a course on philosophy at the Sorbonne. Nevertheless, following his interest in Germany after the war, he studied philosophy at Tübingen University and lectured on French literature and philosophy at the Free University of Berlin. In Berlin, he began his career as a journalist, revealing with his first article the persistence of Nazism in the university system in Germany; he wrote for Le Monde as the first Frenchman who traveled (illegally) through East Germany. This series of articles inspired Jean-Paul Sartre to invite Claude Lanzmann to collaborate with him and Simone de Beauvoir as an editor of their left-wing magazine Les Temps Modernes in 1952, of which Lanzmann is today a director. Claude Lanzmann was awarded his Honorary Doctorate in Philosophy at the European Graduate School EGS in Saas-Fee, Switzerland on June 6, 2004. He was decorated by the French government for resistance efforts during World War II. Claude Lanzmann received the New York Film Critics Circle Award (1985), the Los Angeles Film Critics Award (1985), and the Peabody Award (1987) for Shoah. Other documentary films by Claude Lanzmann are Pourquoi Israel / Why Israel (1973), Tsahal (1994), Un vivant qui passe / A Visitor from the Living (1997), Sobibór, 14 octobre 1943, 16 heures / Sobibor (2001). Claude Lanzmann is the author of The Complete Text of the Acclaimed Holocaust Film SHOAH.

Yael Goldstein Love

Yael Goldstein Love was born and raised in Highland Park, NJ, and attended the Rabbi Pesach Raymon Yeshiva. The final tweaks to her education came at Harvard, where she ignored her grandmother's many warnings and studied philosophy. After graduating college, Yael began work on Overture and supported herself with jobs including but not limited to: bartender, waitress, secretary, event planner, writer for Sparknotes Study Guides, admissions consultant, and publishing assistant for The Paris Review.  After graduating college, Yael began work on Overture and supported herself with jobs including but not limited to: bartender, waitress, secretary, event planner, writer for Sparknotes Study Guides, admissions consultant, and publishing assistant for The Paris Review.  In 2004 she published the short story When Skeptics Die in Commentary Magazine. In 2005 her essay When God is Your Favorite Writer appeared in the anthology Who We Are: On Being (and Not Being) A Jewish American Writer, which won the National Jewish Book Award. She sold Overture to Doubleday in 2005, and it was published in 2007. The paperback version of the novel will be published by Broadway Books in August 2008 under the title The Passion of Tasha Darsky. Yael currently lives in Cambridge, MA, where she teaches at Grub Street, Inc. and is at work on her second novel. Her hobbies include eating, worrying, and interstate moves. She also enjoys meeting with book clubs, in person or by phone. 

Marie-Pierre Ulloa

Marie-Pierre Ulloa is the Associate Director of the Taube Center for Jewish Studies. She is also a lecturer in the French Department, teaching Francophone and North African Cinema and Literature. She is the author of Francis Jeanson, a Dissident Intellectual from the French Resistance to the Algerian War (Stanford University Press, 2008). Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres de la République Francaise (2013). She holds a BA in History from the University of La Sorbonne, a MA in History and Political Science and an Advanced Post-Graduate Diploma in History (summa cum laude) from Sciences Po in Paris, where she wrote her dissertation on intellectual dissidence from World War II to post-Algerian War through the case study of French existentialist philosopher Francis Jeanson. She has an ongoing research project on the Maghrebi Diaspora in the United States.

2010-2011

Arie Dubnov

Arie Dubnov is currently a lecturer in the History Department at Stanford. He comes to us from The Hebrew University as a lecturer in History there. His interests are in modern intellectual history, with emphasis on history of British political thought and modern Jewish history.

Mary Felstiner

Mary Felstiner will teach a course in the English Department with John Felstiner, on Creative Resistance and the Holocaust, in Winter quarter. She is an emeritus professor of History from San Francisco State University.  

John Felstiner

John Felstiner will teach a course in the English Department with Mary Felstiner, on Creative Resistance and the Holocaust, in Winter quarter. His interests include literature, art, and music of the Holocaust; literary translation; Pablo Neruda; Paul Celan; poetry and the environment.

Sophie B. Roberts

Sophie B. Roberts will be teaching in the History Department this academic year. Her interests are in French Colonial and Jewish history. Her research examines issues of citizenship and anti-Semitism in French colonial Algeria. She recently received her Ph.D. in History at the University of Toronto.

Jean-Michael Frodon

Jean-Michel Frodon was born in Paris, 1953. He is a world-renowned journalist and film critic at weekly "Le Point" (1983-1990), "Le Monde" (1990-2003). He was editorial director of "Cahiers du Cinema" between 2003 and 2009, and he is also a member of the Editorial board and permanent writer for Caiman, Cuadernos de Cine (Spain) and founder of the thinktank « L'Exception » : http://lexception.rezo.net/ He is editor in chief of the collaborative website http://artsciencefactory.fr. Jean-Michel Frodon is professor at Sciences Po Paris (Political Sciences Institute) and he is associated with Prof. Bruno Latour for the SPEAP project. Since September 2012 he is Professorial Fellow in Film Studies and Creative Industries at the University of St. Andrews, Scotland.

Itamar Ravinovich

Itamar Rabinovich is an expert on the policies and politics of the Middle East, with a particular interest in Syria, Arab-Israeli relations, and the U.S.-Israel relationship. He served as Israel’s ambassador to the United States and as chief negotiator with Syria from 1992 to 1996. He holds distinguished positions on the boards of several international foundations and on the faculty of leading academic institutions, serving as professor emeritus of Middle Eastern history at Tel Aviv University and distinguished global professor at NYU. 

Tamar Zewi

Visiting Scholar, Taube Center for Jewish Studies

2009-2010

Daphne Barak-Erez

Prof. Daphne Barak-Erez recently left the Faculty of Law after being appointed to the Supreme Court of Israel. She was the Stewart and Judy Colton professor of law and held the chair of law and security. She is a member of the American Law Institute and a member of the International Academy of Comparative Law. Her main research and teaching areas are administrative and constitutional law. In addition, she teaches courses in the areas of feminist jurisprudence, contracts and payment systems. She is a three time graduate of Tel-Aviv University: LL.B. (summa cum laude) 1988; LL.M. (summa cum laude) 1991, and J.S.D, 1993 (recipient of the Colton Fellowship). She was a visiting researcher at Harvard Law School, a visiting fellow at the Max-Planck Institute of Public Law, Heidelberg, an Honorary Research Fellow at University College London, a Visiting Researcher at the Swiss Institute of Comparative Law in  Lausanne, a Visiting Researcher at the Jawarlal Nehru University in Delhi and a Visiting Fellow at the Schell Center at Yale Law School. She has also taught as Visiting Professor at various universities, including the University of Toronto, Columbia Law School and Stanford Law School. In the past, she acted as the Director of the Minerva Center for Human Rights (2000-2001), the chairperson of the Israeli Association of Public Law, the Vice Dean of the faculty (2000-2002), the Director of the Cegla Center for Interdisciplinary Research of  the Law (2009-2011), a member of the Council of Higher Education in Israel (2007-2011), the President of the Israeli Law and Society Association (2010-2011) and the Dean of the faculty (2011-2012). She was awarded several prizes, including the Rector’s Prize for Excellence in Teaching (three times), the Zeltner Prize, the Heshin Prize, the Woman of the City Award (by the City of Tel-Aviv) and the Women in Law Award (by the Israeli Bar). She is the author and editor of several books and of many articles in Israel, England, Canada and the United States. 

Arie Dubnov

Arie Dubnov is currently a lecturer in the History Department at Stanford. He comes to us from The Hebrew University as a lecturer in History there. His interests are in modern intellectual history, with emphasis on history of British political thought and modern Jewish history.

Avi Tchamni

Avi Tchamni will be teaching in the Music Department this coming Winter & Spring where he will teach courses in “Jewish Music in the Lands of Islam” and “Music of Modern Israel,” respectively. He is currently a lecturer in Music at the University of California in Santa Cruz (UCSC).

Tamar Sagiv

Dr. Tamar Sagiv is a lecturer of organizational behavior. She received her Ph.D from the faculty of management at Tel Aviv University (August 2011), and BA in Biology (Magna Cum Laude) from the faculty of life sciences at Tel Aviv University (July 2002). Dr. Sagiv was a visiting researcher at Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley (2008/9) and the Taube Center for Jewish Studies, Stanford University (2009 /10).Dr. Sagiv’s research interests in Macro Organizational Behavior and Strategy include evolution of industries, especially the cultural industry, creativity and authenticity in economic transactions and organizations, evolution of new artistic genres, institutional theory and institutional transformation, corporate governance and elite networks. She seeks to explore how the interplay between individual agents and institutional mechanisms bring (or do not bring) to the formation of new organizational forms.

Shira Stav

Visiting Scholar 2009-2010. I studied for my BA and MA in the department of comparative literature in the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel (2000). I have written my doctorate dissertation on the subject of Father-Daughter Relationships in Hebrew Poetry of the Sixties, under the supervision of Prof. Iris Parush and Dr. Hamutal Tsamir, in the department of Hebrew literature at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Israel (2007).

2008-2009

Yifat Holzman-Gazit

A senior lecturer. Prof. Holzman-Gazit has a J.S.D. from Stanford and focuses on land expropriation under Israeli law and the legal history of the Jewish National Fund. She authored "Land Expropriation in Israel: Law, Culture and Society", served as legal advisor to the Israeli Inter-ministerial Committee on Reform of Land Expropriation Law and was a visiting professor at Stanford Law School. Her current research interests include: media coverage of Israel's Supreme Court and public attitudes toward national commissions of inquiry.

Eliezer Papo

Visiting Professor of Sephardic Studies, African and Middle Eastern Languages (AMELANG) and the Taube Center for Jewish Studies

Ariella Radwin

Visiting Scholar, Dept. of Religious Studies and the Taube Center for Jewish Studies

Steven Uran

Visiting Professor of Jewish History, Dept. of History and the Taube Center for Jewish Studies 

Moshe Idel

Moshe Idel is Max Cooper Professor in Jewish Thought, Department of Jewish Thought at Hebrew University, Jerusalem, and Senior Researcher at the Shalom Hartman Institute. Born in 1947 in Romania, he arrived in 1963 to Israel and has lectured since 1975 at the Hebrew University. He received the Israel Prize for Jewish Thought in 1999, the Emmet Prize in 2002, and is a member of the Israeli Academy since 2006. He has served as visiting Professor at the JTS of America, UCLA, Yale, Harvard, Princeton, University of Pennsylvania, and College de France. Among his publications are Old Worlds, New Mirror, On Jewish Mysticism and Twentieth-Century Thought, (Penn UP, 2010), Kabbalah: New Perspectives (Yale UP 1988), Absorbing Perfections: Kabbalah and Interpretation (Yale UP 2002), and Ben: Sonship and Jewish Mysticism (Continuum, 2007).

Baoz Ganor

Boaz Ganor is the Ronald Lauder Chair for Counter-Terrorism, the Deputy Dean of the Lauder School of Government, the founder and Executive Director of the International Institute for Counter-Terrorism (ICT), and the head of the Counter-Terrorism and Homeland Security Studies Programs (Graduate degree, Executive program and Bachelor specialization) at the Interdisciplinary Center (IDC), Herzliya, Israel. He is also the founder and President of the International Academic Counter-Terrorism Community (ICTAC), an international association of academic institutions, experts, and researchers in fields related to the study of terrorism and counter-terrorism.

Haggay Etkes

Haggay's research deals with historical and contemporary economies of the Middle East, focusing on property rights supporting institutions. He holds an M.Sc. in economics and economic history (LSE), and an M.A. in Middle Eastern history (Tel Aviv U.) and has working knowledge in Arabic, Turkish,
and Hebrew. Last year Haggay completed his Ph.D. (Hebrew U.) on the economic history of Ottoman Gaza under the supervision of N. Sussman, and J. Mokyr, and was a post-doctoral fellow at Stanford U. Haggay is beginning to work at the Bank of Israel's research devision.

2007-2008

Dan Miron

Dr. Dan Miron is the Leonard Kaye Professor of Hebrew and Comparative Literature at Columbia University and an Emeritus professor of Hebrew Literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. A prolific scholar, critic and editor, Dr. Miron has established himself over the last four decades as the leading authority on Hebrew and Yiddish literatures. His influential books (more than thirty; in Hebrew, Yiddish, English, Russian, and German) study most of the outstanding historical issues and major figures of Jewish literatures in modern times. As an editor-scholar, he is responsible for some of the most important Hebrew 'Collected Writings' projects to be published in the recent decades (The variorum edition of Bialik's poems; Gnessin's stories; U. Z . Greenberg's collected works, and now a collected edition of the fictional and political writings of S. Yizhar). His Latest book: Verschraenkungen - ueber juedische Literaturn, published by the Simon Dubnow Institute of the University of Leipzig (2007), offers a comprehensive and innovative view of the entire complex of literary writing by Jews throughout the last two centuries.

Yifat Holzman-Gazit

Yifat Holzman-Gazit is an Associate Professor at the College of Management Law School in Rishon Le'zion, Israel. She has a JSD ('97) from Stanford Law School and an LLB ('89) from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. She clerked for Justice Eliezer Goldberg of the Supreme Court of Israel. Holzman-Gazit’s scholarship focuses on land expropriations under Israeli law, the legal history of the Jewish National Fund and courts and media coverage. Her book Land Expropriation in Israel: Law, Culture and Society will be published later this year. Dr. Holzman-Gazit is at Stanford Law School as a visiting professor on a grant from the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation. At Stanford, she will be teaching two courses: “Arabs in Israeli Society” and “Legal History of the Arab-Jewish Land Conflict”

Aharon Shemesh

Aharon Shemesh is associate professor at the Department of Talmud, Bar-Ilan University and senior fellow at the Shalom Hartman Institute. He served as visiting professor at the Near East Studies department at University of California, Berkeley and at the Department of Religious Studies at Stanford University (2005). Shemesh was twice Harry Starr Fellow at the Center for Jewish studies, Harvard University in the years 1996 and 2007. He was also a fellow at the Oxford center for Hebrew and Jewish in 2000 and during the summer of 2006 he was a resident fellow at the Rockefeller Foundation study center in Bellagio, Italy. Aharon Shemesh has published widely on the development of Jewish law (Halakhah) in antiquity. In recent years he specialized in the field of Halakhah in the Dead Sea Scrolls. His recent publications include: Punishments and Sins: From Scripture to the Rabbis, Magnes, Jerusalem 2003; “4Q251: Midrash Mishpatim”, DSD 12 (2005); “The Laws of the Firstborn and the Cattle Tithe in Qumran Literature and Rabbinic Halakhah”, Megillot 3 (2005);“The Halakhic and Social Status of Women According to the Dead Sea Scrolls,” Annual of Bar-Ilan University, Studies in Judaica and the Humanities 30-31(In memory of Prof. M.S. Feldblum), Ramat-Gan 2006.

2006-2007

Rachel Albeck-Gidron

Rachel Albeck-Girdron is Associate Professor of Hebrew Literature in Bar Ilan University.  Some of her recent publication include: Exiled and Suppressed Voices: On the Ashkenazi Pronunciation of Hebrew as a Postmodernistic Question, On the Poetic Status of Mystical Language in U. Z. Grinberg's Poetry, Who is a Hebrew writer? On National Definitions of Literary Texts and The Draft Renounced by History: Appelfeld's Journey into Winter and the Radiance of Noah's Ark as a Healing Discourse. She is currently working on the relations between Eastern and Jewish philosophies and Hebrew literature and on the works of Yoel Hoffmann. Her book The Monadic Epoch: Leibnitz and the Modernism of the 20th Century will be published this year in Bar-Ilan University Press. Professor Albeck-Gidron will teach at Stanford the course "East West East in Israeli Literature: The Novels of Yoel Hoffman."

Mary Felstiner

Mary Felstiner is professor of History at San Francisco State University and author of the award-winning biography To Paint Her Life: Charlotte Salomon in the Nazi Era, Charlotte Salomon: Een Biografie and Out of Joint: A Private and Public Story of Arthritis (University of Nebraska, 2005).  Felstiner's most recent publication is an article on "Women's Progress, World Progress,"  Journal of Women's History, Volume 17, Number 2 (2005). In the winter quarter of 2007 she  will teach a course on the Holocaust.

Michael K. Silber

Michael K. Silber is a History professor at the  Department of Jewish History, Hebrew University. His work concentrates on the Jews in Austria-Hungary and on the history of Orthodox Jewry.  His research interests are: Modern Jewish history, especially in the Habsburg Empire and Hungary: emancipation, assimilation, Haskala, Orthodoxy, economic history, geographic history, nationalism, the Old Yishuv in Eretz Israel.  Some of his publications include an edited  book on Jews in the Hungarian Economy, 1760-1945, and articles on The Historical Experience of German Jewry and its Impact on Haskalah and Reform in Hungary, A Jewish Minority in a Backward Economy: an Introduction, The Emergence of Ultra-Orthodoxy: the Invention of a Tradition and The Social Composition of the Pest Radical Reform Society.  Silber will teach at Stanford the following courses: "Tradition in Crisis: Orthodox Judaism in  Modern Times" and "Transformation of Central European Jewry: Germany and Austria-Hungary, 1700-1880."

Nathan Wachtel

Nathan Wachtel, Professor of Latin American History and Anthropology, Collège de France, will deliver the  The Aaron-Roland Lecture in Jewish Studies and teach a course on  "Marranos, Conversos, and Crypto-Jews in  Latin America, 16th-20th Centuries." Some of his books include Jewish Memories (with Lucette Valensi), Gods and Vampires and Faith of the Memory.

2005-2006

Amelia Glaser

Amelia Glaser, currently a lecturer in Yiddish language and literature and Slavic Literature, received her Ph.D in Comparative Literature at Stanford in 2004. Amelia spent the last academic year as a fellow at the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute and U. Penn's Center for Advanced Judaic Studies. She recently translated and coedited a bilingual anthology of Yiddish poetry, titled Proletpen: American's Rebel Yiddish Poets (U. of Wisconsin Press, 2005), and is currently revising a book on images of markets and fairs in Russian, Yiddish and Ukrainian literature.

Tim Bradford

Tim Bradford received a BA in Human Biology from Stanford University and recently completed a PhD in English at Oklahoma State University. His poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Diagram, H_NGM_N, Bombay Gin, Poems & Plays, Terminus and Runes, and his novella-in-progress has garnered the support of the Koret Foundation's Young Writer on Jewish Themes Award for 2004-5. Tim Bradford is teaching at Stanford  a course on Modern and Contemporary Hybrid Narratives in fall 2005.  He will read from his work on  Dec 7.

Olga Borovaya

Olga Borovaya, PhD in cultural studies, published a number of articles in English and Russian on Ladino belles lettres. She also authored the first Russian monograph on Sephardi culture: Modernization of a Culture: Belles Lettres and Theater of Ottoman Jews at the Turn of the 20th Century(Moscow, 2005) and Literature and Theater (Moscow, 2005) Currently, she is working on the English book on Ladino literature, and press at the turn of the 20th century. This academic year, she is the American Academy of Jewish Research Fellow at Stanford. She teaches Translation and the Rise of Jewish Literatures in Modern Times in the Autumn, and JEWISHST 247B. Introduction to Ladino Literature in the Winter.

Janis Plotkin

Janis Plotkin, former Executive Artistic Director of the San Francisco Jewish Film Festival, will be teaching at Stanford courses on Jewish Film. Her courses provide fresh and alternative perspectives on history, ethnicity, and identity. A variety of film genres brought the viewer closer to the emotional reality of displacement, memory, and renewal. Janis focused especially on films from Argentina, France, Germany, Holland, Hungary, Israel, Mexico, and the former USSR

Shavit Matias

Shavit Matias is the Deputy Attorney General of Israel; she provides opinions to the Israeli Government on International Law and Policy matters and will teach a class at Stanford in the Spring on Globalization, Middle East Regional Dilemmas, and Israel.